We created Parquet to make the advantages of compressed, efficient columnar data representation available to any project in the Hadoop ecosystem.

Parquet is built from the ground up with complex nested data structures in mind, and uses the record shredding and assembly algorithm described in the Dremel paper. We believe this approach is superior to simple flattening of nested name spaces.

Parquet is built to support very efficient compression and encoding schemes. Multiple projects have demonstrated the performance impact of applying the right compression and encoding scheme to the data. Parquet allows compression schemes to be specified on a per-column level, and is future-proofed to allow adding more encodings as they are invented and implemented.

Parquet is built to be used by anyone. The Hadoop ecosystem is rich with data processing frameworks, and we are not interested in playing favorites. We believe that an efficient, well-implemented columnar storage substrate should be useful to all frameworks without the cost of extensive and difficult to set up dependencies.


The parquet-format project contains format specifications and Thrift definitions of metadata required to properly read Parquet files.

The parquet-mr project contains multiple sub-modules, which implement the core components of reading and writing a nested, column-oriented data stream, map this core onto the parquet format, and provide Hadoop Input/Output Formats, Pig loaders, and other java-based utilities for interacting with Parquet.

The parquet-compatibility project contains compatibility tests that can be used to verify that implementations in different languages can read and write each other’s files.


Java resources can be build using mvn package. The current stable version should always be available from Maven Central.

C++ thrift resources can be generated via make.

Thrift can be also code-genned into any other thrift-supported language.


See How to Release.


Hierarchically, a file consists of one or more row groups. A row group contains exactly one column chunk per column. Column chunks contain one or more pages.

Unit of parallelization

File format

This file and the thrift definition should be read together to understand the format.

4-byte magic number "PAR1"
<Column 1 Chunk 1 + Column Metadata>
<Column 2 Chunk 1 + Column Metadata>
<Column N Chunk 1 + Column Metadata>
<Column 1 Chunk 2 + Column Metadata>
<Column 2 Chunk 2 + Column Metadata>
<Column N Chunk 2 + Column Metadata>
<Column 1 Chunk M + Column Metadata>
<Column 2 Chunk M + Column Metadata>
<Column N Chunk M + Column Metadata>
File Metadata
4-byte length in bytes of file metadata
4-byte magic number "PAR1"

In the above example, there are N columns in this table, split into M row groups. The file metadata contains the locations of all the column metadata start locations. More details on what is contained in the metadata can be found in the thrift files.

Metadata is written after the data to allow for single pass writing.

Readers are expected to first read the file metadata to find all the column chunks they are interested in. The columns chunks should then be read sequentially.

File Layout


There are three types of metadata: file metadata, column (chunk) metadata and page header metadata. All thrift structures are serialized using the TCompactProtocol.

Metadata diagram


The types supported by the file format are intended to be as minimal as possible, with a focus on how the types effect on disk storage. For example, 16-bit ints are not explicitly supported in the storage format since they are covered by 32-bit ints with an efficient encoding. This reduces the complexity of implementing readers and writers for the format. The types are: - BOOLEAN: 1 bit boolean - INT32: 32 bit signed ints - INT64: 64 bit signed ints - INT96: 96 bit signed ints - FLOAT: IEEE 32-bit floating point values - DOUBLE: IEEE 64-bit floating point values - BYTE_ARRAY: arbitrarily long byte arrays.

Logical Types

Logical types are used to extend the types that parquet can be used to store, by specifying how the primitive types should be interpreted. This keeps the set of primitive types to a minimum and reuses parquet’s efficient encodings. For example, strings are stored as byte arrays (binary) with a UTF8 annotation. These annotations define how to further decode and interpret the data. Annotations are stored as a ConvertedType in the file metadata and are documented in

Nested Encoding

To encode nested columns, Parquet uses the Dremel encoding with definition and repetition levels. Definition levels specify how many optional fields in the path for the column are defined. Repetition levels specify at what repeated field in the path has the value repeated. The max definition and repetition levels can be computed from the schema (i.e. how much nesting there is). This defines the maximum number of bits required to store the levels (levels are defined for all values in the column).

Two encodings for the levels are supported BITPACKED and RLE. Only RLE is now used as it supersedes BITPACKED.


Nullity is encoded in the definition levels (which is run-length encoded). NULL values are not encoded in the data. For example, in a non-nested schema, a column with 1000 NULLs would be encoded with run-length encoding (0, 1000 times) for the definition levels and nothing else.

Data Pages

For data pages, the 3 pieces of information are encoded back to back, after the page header. We have the - definition levels data,
- repetition levels data, - encoded values. The size of specified in the header is for all 3 pieces combined.

The data for the data page is always required. The definition and repetition levels are optional, based on the schema definition. If the column is not nested (i.e. the path to the column has length 1), we do not encode the repetition levels (it would always have the value 1). For data that is required, the definition levels are skipped (if encoded, it will always have the value of the max definition level).

For example, in the case where the column is non-nested and required, the data in the page is only the encoded values.

The supported encodings are described in

Column chunks

Column chunks are composed of pages written back to back. The pages share a common header and readers can skip over page they are not interested in. The data for the page follows the header and can be compressed and/or encoded. The compression and encoding is specified in the page metadata.


Data pages can be individually checksummed. This allows disabling of checksums at the HDFS file level, to better support single row lookups.

Error recovery

If the file metadata is corrupt, the file is lost. If the column metdata is corrupt, that column chunk is lost (but column chunks for this column in other row groups are okay). If a page header is corrupt, the remaining pages in that chunk are lost. If the data within a page is corrupt, that page is lost. The file will be more resilient to corruption with smaller row groups.

Potential extension: With smaller row groups, the biggest issue is placing the file metadata at the end. If an error happens while writing the file metadata, all the data written will be unreadable. This can be fixed by writing the file metadata every Nth row group.
Each file metadata would be cumulative and include all the row groups written so far. Combining this with the strategy used for rc or avro files using sync markers, a reader could recover partially written files.

Separating metadata and column data.

The format is explicitly designed to separate the metadata from the data. This allows splitting columns into multiple files, as well as having a single metadata file reference multiple parquet files.



There are many places in the format for compatible extensions: - File Version: The file metadata contains a version. - Encodings: Encodings are specified by enum and more can be added in the future.
- Page types: Additional page types can be added and safely skipped.